Category Flowers

Tulip
Flowers

Tulip

Tulip: THE TULIP FLOWER That mutable you make the color of the vague petal and tighten the green stel in an embrace the symbol is you of that careless love changes and the heart leaves in the gel? If such, imprudent, it makes you nature, you are worthy, miserable, of the lascivious dances and of the fragor that in the harem s'avviva, and of the impure slave that praises when you bloom, or fior.

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Flowers

Lychnis - Lychnis flos-cuculi

Lychnis: Fior Cuculo grows strictly in the countryside and in marshes or marshy areas. The name attributed to the flower from the rural tradition is to be traced back to the formation on the trunk of the plant of white and soft matter, similar to cotton. The meaning of the Fior Cuculo in the language of flowers is instead linked to the serrated shape of the flowers of the plant, which recall the industriousness and ingenuity, synonymous with careful application and sophistication; the shape of the flowers is indeed very special.
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Flowers

Fuchsia - Fuchsia

Fuchsia: It comes from Mexico, where it grows as a tree. In Europe it arrived in the '700, thanks to the sailors of the English ships, that returning from South America, brought with them some specimens. The British tradition says that the botanist James Lee noticed the fuchsia, for the first time, on the window sill of a house in the suburbs of London.
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Flowers

Agave

Agave: Piana succulente originating from central-southern America, very well adapted to Mediterranean climates; it is very familiar especially for the particularity of flowering once, just before death. In fact the adult plants produce a long cylindrical stem, which carries numerous bell-shaped flowers, of medium size, after which they dry up.
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Flowers

Amaryllis

Amaryllis: Amaryllis are large bulbous plants, native to Africa, large flowers bloom on a long fleshy stem; their meaning in the language of flowers derives from the appearance of the flower, large and majestic, of bright colors, often accompanied by a delicate fragrance.
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Flowers

Shamrock

The common name of this flower, Acetosella, derives from the "acid" and somewhat sour taste of the leaves of the plant, which in ancient times were used just as a condiment for salads. The slender posture and apparently fragile, as well as the characteristic that distinguishes the Acetosella, that is to say the folding in on itself during the rains or the strong wind as to protect itself, have determined the meaning that in the language of the flowers is associated with the plant : protection and motherly love.
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Flowers

Alstroemeria

A flower originating from South America, particularly in Peru. For this reason it is also called Peruvian lily. This flower blooms in bunches carried on long fleshy stems; easily cultivable also in the garden, where small bulbs can be placed, Alstroemeria find more and more space also in bouquets and bouquets.
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Flowers

Acanthus mollis

Acanthus is a perennial herbaceous plant loved since ancient times, Pliny the Elder in his botanical treatises, in 50 D.C., suggested the elegant and superb acanthus plants to adorn the braves of Roman gardens. A hundred years before Virgil had imagined Elena di Troia draped with a white peplos with the edges adorned with acanthus leaves and beech; finally an Athenian architect, Callimaco, in 500 A.
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Flowers

Holly

The Druids used it to hunt evil spirits; Pliny the Elder, in the first century BC, advised him to plant it near the front door, to protect it from the treachery of the wicked. In many countries of the North, in the Middle Ages, it was thought that this plant was endowed with a power greater than that of the aggressors and the ability to protect from the elements in the long dark nights in winter.
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Flowers

Anemone

Anemone: The term anemone derives from the Greek anemos, which means wind; for this reason the anemone is commonly called wind flower. This appellation is undoubtedly to refer also to the very short duration that the anemone flowers have and, at the same time, to the great fragility that characterizes them.
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Flowers

Aquilegia

Aquilegia: The origin of the term aquilegia has long been debated. There are scholars who believe that the name of this flower is closely related to the etymological root of the term and that is aquilegium, which in Latin means water collector and which recalls the concave shape of the leaves of the plant.
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Flowers

Burdock

Burdock: Burdock owes its name to the curved shape of its flower; moreover, the flower is characterized by the fact that it is slightly sticky and at the same time difficult to remove once attached. Precisely because of this peculiarity, typical of Burdock flowers, the meaning attributed to it is that of privacy and reluctance, just to signify the natural tendency of the plant to distance itself from its contact.
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Flowers

Aconite

Their particular appearance and their poisonousness gave rise to myths and legends, which have always indicated the aconite as the flower of revenge and guilty love. Greek mythology tells that Cerberus, a three-headed dog from Hecate, queen of Hades, brought aconite seeds into the foam.
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Flowers

Orange

Orange: It has always been considered a well-wishing tree. His country of origin is China; it seems that, since the twelfth century, a load of fruits started at the beginning of each year from Beijing headed for one of the Foochow temples to celebrate sacrifices to the gods. The offering of oranges on the first day of the year meant a wish for happiness, prosperity and abundance.
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Flowers

Leon's mouth

Lion's mouth: The name "lion's mouth" derives from the appearance of the flower, which is reminiscent of a mouth on one side, an animal nose on the other. Tradition has always considered it the flower of caprice; in the Middle Ages, in fact, the girls used to adorn their hair with these flowers to refuse unwanted suitors.
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Flowers

Chelidonium - Chelidonium majus

Chelidonium: This plant owes its name to the fact that its flowering occurs in early spring and more precisely when the first swallows appear; the name celandine derives from the Greek word "chelidon" which means swallow. An ancient popular belief also tells that the swallows are usually rubbing sprigs of celandine on the still closed eyes of their young.
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Flowers

Amaranth

Amaranto Lunga is the tradition that considers amaranth a sacred plant. The name amaranth comes from the Greek amarantos and that is "that does not fade". Hence the meaning attributed to it by the Greeks of plant of friendship, of mutual esteem and more generally of all true feelings which should never change with the passage of time, as they are eternal and unique.
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Flowers

Camellia

Camellia: Camellia comes from China and Japan, where many varieties grow. In Europe the camellias were imported by G. J. Camel starting from the second half of the 1700s. However, this splendid plant reached great popularity only a century later, following the success of Dumas's novel, "The Lady of the Camellias".
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Flowers

Marigold

Calendola: The term calendola comes from the Latin calendae which means first day of the month. The meaning of the name used to indicate this flower is to be attributed both to the fact that its flowering takes place, in temperate climate zones, a little always, in every period of the year, and to the fact that the flowers open to morning and close again at sunset.
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Flowers

Bignonia

Bignonia: Bignonia is native to central-southern America. Even today, among the peoples of Mexico, Peru and Argentina, it is considered the symbol of prosperity, of wealth and therefore, if given, expresses good luck and fortune. In this regard it is used to decorate churches during ceremonies and generally placed near the front door, to protect and bring good luck to those who live there.
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Flowers

Cherry tree

Cherry: Discussed and controversial is the meaning attributed to the cherry tree over the centuries and in different populations: in Central European countries the cherry tree has always been considered the protector of the fields against the bad guys; in the Scandinavian countries and in Great Britain, on the other hand, it is the symbol of misfortune and of next misfortunes; in the East and in particular in Japan, cherry is the emblem of sensuality and femininity.
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