Gardening

The hedges


The hedges


The hedges are made up of rows of plants, often evergreen, cultivated to perform some particular functions; they are used as a border line for a border, as a protection for particular areas of a garden, such as shelter from wind or noise, such as shading. Evergreen plants are often used, since, maintaining the leaves throughout the year, they perform protective functions even during the winter months; many hedges however, they also consist of deciduous plants, or often also flowering plants.
Most of the shrubs and small trees grown in the garden are suitable for forming a hedge, but it is wise to choose wisely the essence to be used, depending on the needs for which the hedge itself is desired.
Generally the hedges they are composed of plants of the same species and of the same variety, almost composing a compact and uniform vegetable "wall"; to make the hedge more pleasing to the eye it is also possible to use plants of the same genus, for example all evergreens, but of different species or varieties, so as to create an alternation in the color of the leaves or flowers, which makes the hedge more decorative .

Hedges of evergreens



In the event that we need a hedge to shelter from the wind or from the noise that remains thick and dense all year long, it is good to place evergreen plants, so that they do not lose their leaves. Most of the hedges are of this type, and for this purpose plants of easy cultivation and with few needs are used.
We list some essences commonly used in evergreen hedges






















































































Aucuba: variegated leaves and red berries in winter; fit in the shade



Bambù: very vigorous plant, it is often good to contain its development


Berberis: many varieties on the market, even with very decorative leaves; thorny hedge; also dwarf varieties

Boxwood: slow-growing hedge, there are dwarf varieties; widely used in rose gardens and botanical gardens

Cotoneaster: widespread, there are erect and even prostrate varieties, red berries

Pyracantha: thorny hedge with vigorous development; orange, red or yellow berries; compact varieties exist

Eleagnus: there are many varieties, even with a variegated leaf

Evonimo: also deciduous and with decorative berries

Eucalyptus: aromatic plant, slightly sensitive to frost

Ilex: vigorous and decorative plant, there are thorny and also dwarf or variegated leaf varieties


Laurus: very common aromatic plant, sometimes it is seriously infested by cochineal


Privet: also used in topiary art, there are varieties with large and variegated leaves

Lonicera: fairly slow development, it remains within medium or small dimensions

Mahonia: fragrant flowers in spring, golden yellow in color, thorny leaves

Nerium: very popular summer flowering; poisonous plant

Nandina: the leaves turn red in winter; red berries, white flowers

Osmanthus: in autumn it produces very fragrant flowers, many varieties available

Pieris: acidophilous plant, spring flowering and young red leaves

Photinia: vigorous plant, the new leaves in spring are bright red

Pitosporo: fragrant flowers in summer; there is also a dwarf variety with a prostrate habit

Prunus laurocerasus: a typical hedge plant, very vigorous and rapidly developing

Viburnum: there are many varieties, including flower and deciduous; dark berries in winter

Quercus ilex: the classic holm oak, widely used also along roads and avenues

Arbutus: very particular, beautiful foliage; white flowers in winter, edible fruits in summer-autumn

Phyllirea angustifolia: shrub with decorative berries

Callistemon: plant of Australian origin, fears intense cold

Prunus lusitanica:
very vigorous evergreen plant


Rosemary: a medicinal herb also widely used as a hedge


  • Olive tree - Eleagnus



    The Olivagno or Eleagnus is a genus that includes about 50 species of evergreen or deciduous trees or shrubs, originating in Asia. The stems are erect, dark in color, densely branched, difficult ...
  • Pittosporo - Pittosporum



    The pittosporum belongs to the pittosporaceae family. It is a plant native to eastern Asia, Africa and Australia, from which most of the species come, which are cir ...
  • Pyracantha and Cotoneaster



    Pyracantha and cotoneaster are two kinds of evergreen shrubs belonging to the Rosaceae family; both genres originate from North America, Europe and Asia, with a ...
  • Flowering hedges



    Many of us have in the garden or on the terrace a hedge, small, large, enormous, with thorns, evergreen; there are various types of plants suitable for making a hedge, even if they are often used ...

Flowering hedges


When we wish that our hedge also gives us a decorative flowering, accentuated by the presence of several plants placed near it, we can choose flowering plants; also in this case, in general, essences of easy cultivation are chosen, and free from diseases. We can also plant plants that produce decorative berries, so as to have a pleasant hedge even during the winter months.
We recall here some species of flowering or berry shrubs easily found.
If desired you can compose a mixed hedge, choosing plants with different flowering periods, so as to obtain a flowering hedge from March until the first cold, with different colors.

























































































































Flowering hedges


When we wish that our hedge also gives us a decorative flowering, accentuated by the presence of several plants placed near it, we can choose flowering plants; also in this case, in general, essences of easy cultivation are chosen, and free from diseases. We can also plant plants that produce decorative berries, so as to have a pleasant hedge even during the winter months.
We recall here some species of flowering or berry shrubs easily found.
If desired you can compose a mixed hedge, choosing plants with different flowering periods, so as to obtain a flowering hedge from March until the first cold, with different colors.

Chaenomeles japonica: pink flowers, white or red, in early spring



Pyracantha: small white flowers and orange or yellow berries


Azalea: spectacular spring flowering, evergreen or deciduous plant

Camellia: evergreen plant with showy flowering in spring

Forsithya: flowers already in February-March

Abelia: long summer flowering

Amelanchier: white flowering in late spring, edible berries

Caryopteris: flowering that lasts from May until the first cold

Callistemon: particular plant of Australian origin

Deutzia: flowers in spring

Hibisco: flowers all summer long

Kerria: yellow flowers in April

Hiperico: ground flowering shrub with yellow flowers, produced from May to October

Kolkwitzia: summer flowering

Weigelia: flowers in spring

Mahonia: fragrant flowers in early spring

Philadelphus: abundant flowering in late spring

Hydrangeas: large flowers throughout the summer, also suitable for shade

Rose: many species have very long blooms

Spirea: white or pink flowers in spring

Ginestra: very suitable for sunny places

Acacia: there are various species, generally they bloom in March

Oleander: produces bunches of flowers throughout the summer

Cotoneaster: small white flowers and decorative red berries

Potentilla: yellow or red flowers

Tamerix: shrub or small tree with abundant spring flowering

Callicarpa: white flowers, little decorative and winter berries of violet color

Cestrum: fragrant flowers, gathered in clusters

Lagestroemia: shrub or small tree, there are also dwarf varieties

Lavender: very aromatic aromatic plant

Cotinus: purple leaves and particular feathery flowers

Prunus da fiore: many species, spring-flowering

Myrtle: aromatic plant with small white flowers and dark berries

Viburnum opulus: flowers in round clusters

Buddleja: summer flowers, very fragrant

Symphoricarpos: candid berries in winter

Lilacs: flowers in panicles, in spring

Hawthorn: white flowers and red berries

Jasmine nudiflorum: yellow flowers at the end of winter

Camelia: flowers in shades of pink


























































































































Hedges of conifers


The hedges of conifers are widely used, especially in the central-northern regions of our peninsula; they are evergreen, very dense and thick, and generally do not require much care to give excellent results. There are many species and varieties of conifers suitable for cultivation in a hedge, many varieties are also the result of hybridisations, implemented to create varieties with showy or particular colors, or small dimensions; usually the most used are species of the cypress or juniper genus. Here are some

Chaenomeles japonica: pink flowers, white or red, in early spring



Pyracantha: small white flowers and orange or yellow berries


Azalea: spectacular spring flowering, evergreen or deciduous plant

Camellia: evergreen plant with showy flowering in spring

Forsithya: flowers already in February-March

Abelia: long summer flowering

Amelanchier: white flowering in late spring, edible berries

Caryopteris: flowering that lasts from May until the first cold

Callistemon: particular plant of Australian origin

Deutzia: flowers in spring

Hibisco: flowers all summer long

Kerria: yellow flowers in April

Hiperico: ground flowering shrub with yellow flowers, produced from May to October

Kolkwitzia: summer flowering

Weigelia: flowers in spring

Mahonia: fragrant flowers in early spring

Philadelphus: abundant flowering in late spring

Hydrangeas: large flowers throughout the summer, also suitable for shade

Rose: many species have very long blooms

Spirea: white or pink flowers in spring

Ginestra: very suitable for sunny places

Acacia: there are various species, generally they bloom in March

Oleander: produces bunches of flowers throughout the summer

Cotoneaster: small white flowers and decorative red berries

Potentilla: yellow or red flowers

Tamerix: shrub or small tree with abundant spring flowering

Callicarpa: white flowers, little decorative and winter berries of violet color

Cestrum: fragrant flowers, gathered in clusters

Lagestroemia: shrub or small tree, there are also dwarf varieties

Lavender: very aromatic aromatic plant

Cotinus: purple leaves and particular feathery flowers

Prunus da fiore: many species, spring-flowering

Myrtle: aromatic plant with small white flowers and dark berries

Viburnum opulus: flowers in round clusters

Buddleja: summer flowers, very fragrant

Symphoricarpos: candid berries in winter

Lilacs: flowers in panicles, in spring

Hawthorn: white flowers and red berries

Jasmine nudiflorum: yellow flowers at the end of winter

Camelia: flowers in shades of pink


























Large hardwood hedges


In ancient times in the Po Valley the plots of land were divided with hedges consisting of broad-leaved trees, generally poplars, ash trees, plane trees or other native essences, also used to consolidate the banks of irrigation canals; this type of hedges, also present today in many areas of Italy, have rapid growth, offer good shading and high protection from strong winds. For a good maintenance of a hedge of tall trees it is however advisable to periodically cut all the plants at 50-100 cm from the ground, so as to form a thick stump. Once the periodic pruning treatments of the stumps along the canals also provided a good supply of firewood. Today this type of hedges, generally of large dimensions, are used in the case of large plots of land, given the final dimensions that can reach: 3-5 meters in height; always present in many areas, it is also favoring their reintegration in the countryside, also considering the importance they take as shelters for many animal species, especially birds that nest in the branches of the stumps.
Today many tree or shrub species are used for hedges of this type, we report some of them:

Cupressus



Cupressocyparis leylandii


Thuja

Tsuga

Taxus baccata

Juniperus virginiana

Chamaeciparis lawsoniana

Cryptomeria
























































Place a hedge


Once the plants are chosen it is advisable to put them all together; first of all it is good to work the soil, adding manure and sand, to improve and enrich the substrate, so as to make it fertile and well-drained; if we have chosen plants that like acid ph soils, it is also necessary to add peat to the soil.
Therefore we arrange the place where to arrange the row of plants: with a string and two sticks we prepare the reference line, so that the hedge is well straight and tidy; then we proceed preparing an excavation deep enough to contain the bread of plant roots; generally hedge shrubs, 40-50 cm high, are planted at a distance of 65-75 cm; if we have smaller plants we will have to place them at a shorter distance. Once the small plants that make up the hedge are planted, we press the soil around the stems well and proceed with a generous watering, which soaks the soil well in depth.
It is therefore advisable to mulch the soil around the stems of the plants, so as to avoid the excessive development of weeds and to keep the foot of the shrubs cool and slightly damp even during the hot summer garlands; for this purpose you can use pine bark, or dry leaves or lapillus.
If the soil is well drained and rich in organic material in general our plants will not give us great problems, even if it will be good to repeat the fertilization every year, at the end of winter.


Pruning


For an optimal development it is good to intervene with the prunings, with the first ones the plants are modeled up to obtain the desired shape, with the following prunings the development of the hedge is contained and the inner parts of the plants are ventilated and illuminated, so to avoid the loss of foliage in the twigs closest to the trunk.
Hedges are available in nurseries g


Chestnut



Ash tree


Robinia

Elm tree

Mulberry

plane tree

Alder

Poplar

Acer negundo

Willow

Sorbo

Dogwood

English Oak

Carpino

Celtis

Wild cherry

Corylus colurna

Beech tree